Publications

  The Curtiss Hawk 75 was the export version of the USAAC Curtiss P-36 that became, from 1936 onwards, the standard American single-seat fighter and represented a big step forward…

The Curtiss P-40 was the most numerous USAAF fighter on hand when the United States entered the war in December 1941. A development of the Curtiss P-36, the P-40 was…

Turret equipped fighters became operational with the Royal Air Force during WW2 as the result of the British Government's ongoing concern about German aerial attacks on the United Kingdom during…

Designed before the Mk. IX, but following it into service because its radical design changes would have meant production delays when time was of the essence, the Spitfire Mk. Vlll…

The Fortress Mk.II and Mk.III were the equivalent of the USAAF’s B-17E/F and G. The Fortress Mk.I was the B-17C as featured in ‘SQUADRONS! No. 4’. The Fortress Mk.I was…

The Douglas Boston or Havoc is one major aircraft of WW2. Designed as a light bomber, it proved to be very versatile and was used with success in various roles…

The Republic Thunderbolt came into RAF inventory when it became clear the RAF would be unable to obtain enough North American Mustangs from the Americans. By 1943, the RAF was…

The Douglas Boston or Havoc is one major aircraft of WW2. Designed as a light bomber, it proved to be very versatile and was used with success in various roles…

Paradoxically, the Mk.V, which ended up being the most numerous variant of the famous fighter built, was not even an intended development of the design. Indeed, it was only considered…