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December 2017: Grumman AF Guardian – 29 photos

Each photograph is offered at a 300dpi res/13x8cm size making them available for a very good quality digital print, but also for Iphone/IPad, smartphone or computer screen (but should convert the image into a jpeg format for doing so)

More details about this aircraft can be found in the publication USN Aircraft 1922-1962 Volume 2 for the paperback version, but the e-books are available in this site.

 

Grumman AF – photo 01: Grumman AF-2W BuNo 124191of Anti-Submarine Squadron Twenty-Four (VS-24) in flight. Accepted in October 1950, it was stricken in December 1956.

Grumman AF – photo 02: A Grumman AF-2S and a AF-2W in flight. The aircraft are from Anti-Submarine Squadron Thirty-Seven (VS-37).

Grumman AF – photo 03: A Grumman AF-2S and a AF-2W of Anti-Submarine Squadron Thirty Seven (VS-37) in flight over the San Diego area.

Grumman AF – photo 04: Two Gfumman AF-2S Guardians and two AF-2Ws of Anti-Submarine Squadron Twenty-Four (VS-24) fly in formation over Norfolk, VA.

Grumman AF – photo 05: Grumman AF-2S BuNo 123108 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Nine Hundred Thirty-One (VS-931), later VS-20, with damage, shown on the deck of USS Sicily (CVE-118). Accepted in July 1950, it was stricken in December 1956.

Grumman AF – photo 06: A Grumman  AF-2S of Anti-Submarine Squadron Thirty Seven (VS-37) on the deck of USS Badoeng Strait (CVE-116).

Grumman AF – photo 07: Grumman AF-2S BuNo 124784 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Thirty-One (VS-31). Accepted in July 1951, it was stricken in December 1956.

Grumman AF – photo 08: Grumman AF-2S BuNo 126821 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Thirty-One (VS-31). It was accepted in July 1952 and stricken in May 1957.

Grumman AF – photo 09: Grumman AF-2S BuNo 126770 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Thirty-Six (VS-36). It was accepted in February 1952 and stricken in October 1954 after an accident.

Grumman AF – photo 10: Grumman AF-2S BuNo 126809 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Twenty-Four (VS-24) on the ground at Detroit-Wayne Airport. Accepted in Februray 1952 it was to be stricken in December 1956.

Grumman AF – photo 11: Grumman AF-2S BuNo 126793 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Twenty-One (VS-21) in flames on the deck of a carrier. Despite evidence, the aircraft was repaired and was stricken in December 1956. The USN accepted this AF in April 1954.

Grumman AF – photo 12: Grumman AF-2W BuNo 123091 during a pre-delivery fligth to the Navy. It was the second AF-2W buit and was accepted by the USN in January 1950. It was stricken in December 1956 with the bulk of the fleet.

Grumman AF – photo 13: Grumman AF-2W BuNo 124803 of Anti Submarine Squadron Nine Hundred Thirty-One (VS-931), which later became VS-20, on the deck of CVL-29 (USS Bataan). It was accepted in May 1951 and stricken in September 1954.

Grumman AF – photo 14: Grumman AF-2W BuNo 129284 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Eight Hundred Thirty-One (VS-831), later VS-36, on the ground. This airframe served the Navy between September 1952 and December 1956.

Grumman AF – photo 15: Grumman AF-2W BuNo 124791 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Twenty-Seven (VS-27) on the ground at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville. It was in service between March 1951 and June 1957.

Grumman AF – photo 16: Grumman AF-2W BuNo 126833 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Twenty-Two (VS-22). It was accepted in April 1952 and stricken after in accident in March 1955.

Grumman AF – photo 17: Grumman AF-2W BuNo 124195 of Oakland Naval Reserve on the the ground at Naval Air Station (NAS) Oakland. It was accepted in October 1950 and was stricken in December 1956.

Grumman AF – photo 18: Grumman AF-2W BuNo 129276 on the ground at Pax River, MD. It was in service with the Navy between August 1952 and December 1956.

Grumman AF – photo 19: A Grumman AF-2W of Anti-Submarine Squadron Thirty-Seven (VS-37).

Grumman AF – photo 20: The second Grumman AF-2S, BuNo 123090, seen during a test flight before delivery to the Navy in January 1950. Its career would be short being stricken from the inventory in April 1954 after having flown 153 hours only.

Grumman AF – photo 21: A Grumman AF-2S being ready to be launched from an aircraft-career.

Grumman AF – photo 50: The first Grumman AF-3S, BuNo 129243, during a test flight. Accepted in December 1952, it was stricken in May 1957, having flown 1229 hours for the Navy.

Grumman AF – photo 51: Grumman AF-3S BuNo 130367 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Twenty-Seven (VS-27). It was accepted in March 1953 and was stricken in December 1956.

Grumman AF – photo 52: Grumman AF-3S BuNo 130385 of Anti-Submarine Squadron Twenty (VS-10) on the ground at Naval Air Station (NAS) Oakland, CA. It was in service between April 1953 and March 1957.

Grumman AF – photo 53: A Grumman AF-3S of Anti-Submarine Squadron Twenty-Two (VS-22) in flight.

Grumman AF – photo 54:  A Grumman AF-3S of Naval Air Reserve Training Unit ( NARTU) New Yorkon the ground at Naval Air Station (NAS) Norfolk VA.

Grumman AF – photo 55: Grumman AF-3S BuNo 129348 was accepted in January 1953 and it is seen while seving Naval Air Reserve Training Unit (NARTU) New York at the end of its career. It was stricken in April 1957.

Grumman AF – photo 56: Grumman AF-3S BuNo 130366 of Naval Reserve Squadron at Los Alamitos. Accepted in March 1953 and stricken in December 1956.

Grumman AF – photo 57: Opposite view of Grumman AF-3S BuNo 130366 (see above photo 56).

November 2017: Hawker Horsley – 17 photos

Each photograph is offered at a 300dpi res/13x8cm size making them available for a very good quality digital print, but also for Iphone/IPad, smartphone or computer screen (but should convert the image into a jpeg format for doing so)

 

Horsley 01: Hawker Horsley J7992, No. 100 Sqn.

Horsley 02: Hawker Horsley J7996, No. 100 Sqn.

Horsley 03: Hawker Horsley J8609, No. 100 Sqn.

Horsley 04: Hawker Horsley J8613, No. 504 Sqn.

Horsley 05: Hawker Horsley J8618, No. 504 Sqn.

Horsley 06: Hawker Horsley S1238, No. 36 Sqn.

Horsley 07: Hawker Horsley S1243, No. 100 Sqn (forefront), flying over Firth. Leading, J8602.

Horsley 08: Hawker Horlsey of No. 36 Sqn, (S1248/8 and S1242/7)

Horsley 09: Hawker Horsley S1246, No. 36 Sqn dropping its torpedo.

Horsley 10: Hawker Horsley S1439, No. 36 Sqn coded C. Behind, Horlsey S1438, coded B.

Horsley 11: Hawker Horlsey of No. 36 Sqn (S1604/P, S1443/M)

Horsley 12: Hawker Horsley, No. 36 Sqn, coded W.

Horsley 13: Hawker Horsley, No. 36 Sqn, coded C.

Horsley 14: Hawker Horsley, No. 36 Sqn, coded X.

Horsley 15: Hawker Horsley S1452, No. 36 Sqn.

Horsley 16: Hawker Horsley S1600, No. 36 Sqn dropping its torpedo.

Horsley 17: Hawker Horlsey S1613, No. 36 Sqn.

October 2017: Supermarine Spitfire Mk VI – 11 photos

Each photograph is offered at a 300dpi res/13x8cm size making them available for a very good quality digital print, but also for Iphone/IPad, smartphone or computer screen (but should convert the image into a jpeg format for doing so)

 

Many of those photos can be found in the publication SQUADRONS! No. 1: The Spitfire Mk. VI – 978-2918590-38-5

pdf, Epub and Kindle versions are available in this site: 978-2918590-25-5

 

Spitfire VI – photo 01: Side view of Spitfire VI AB200 early in 1942. AB200 was the first production Mk.VI. It was used for various tests the next 18 months.

Spitfire VI – photo 02: Spitfire Mk VI AB200 taken from another angle

Spitfire VI – photo 03: Spitfire VI AB534 was delivered in March 1942 and would serve with No. 616 Sqn in May 1942. It was lost during the cover of Operation ‘Jubilee’ in August 1942.

Spitfire VI – photo 04: Spitfire Mk VI BR289 was first used by the AFDU and later with No. 616 Sqn from October 1942 onwards.

Spitfire VI – photo 05: Two views of Spitfire VI X4942 (with photo 06 below), the second Spitfire modified as an Mk.VI, which is seen as the first true prototype.

Spitfire VI – photo 06: See above.

Spitfire VI – photo 07:  Spitfire VI BR579/ON-H seen from an interesting angle. Note the large cabin air intake, part of the pressure system uner the pipes. It is another way to identify a Mk.VI, like the four-blade propeller. Worth noting, just before the cockpit, the name ‘Boroda’ from the surname of the Squadron has been partially over painted.

Spitfire VI – photo 08:  Spitfire Mk VI  BR579/ON-H  of No. 124 Squadron.

Spitfire VI – photo 09: Spitfire Mk VI  BR579/ON-H  of No. 124 Squadron taken from the front.

Spitfire VI – photo 10: Spitfire Mk VI BS124 while in service with the High Altitude Flight at Aboukir fitted with the large Vokes dust-proof filter.

 

Spitfire VI – photo 11: Another view of Spitfire Mk VI BS124 in Egypt.

September 2017: Boulton Paul Defiant, night fighter – 17 photos

Each photograph is offered at a 300dpi res/13x8cm size making them available for a very good quality digital print, but also for Iphone/IPad, smartphone or computer screen (but should convert the image into a jpeg format for doing so)

Many of those photos can be found in the publication SQUADRONS! No. 19: The Defiant day and night fighter –  979-1096490-06-6

pdf, Epub and Kindle versions are available in this site: 979-1096490-07-3

Defiant Night Fighter 01: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I N1744 of No. 256 Squadron. (see also photo 09)

 

Defiant Night Fighter 02: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I N3313 of No. 264 Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 03: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I V1110 of No. 410 (RCAF) Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 04: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I T3340 of No. 255 Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 05: Six Boulton Paul Defiant Mark I night fighters of 264 Squadron, based at West Malling, Kent, flying in port echelon formation.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 06: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. II AA436 of No. 151 Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 07: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I V1123 of No. 410 (RCAF) Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 08: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I T4052 of No. 96 Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 09: Another view of Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I N1744 of No. 256 Squadron. (see also photo 01)

 

Defiant Night Fighter 10: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I N1770 of No. 256 Squadron.

Defiant Night Fighter 11: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I T4037 of No. 256 Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 12: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I T3954 of No. 96 Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 13: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I T3937 of No. 409 (RCAF) Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 14: A bit blurry, but this photo is interesting as it shows three Defiants of 307 Sqn flying in formation while heading out for a convoy patrol in 1941.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 15: A Polish Defiant of No. 307 SQuadron during the winter 1940-1941.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 16: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I N1773 of No. 264 Squadron.

 

Defiant Night Fighter 17: Boulton-Paul Defiant Mk. I N1791 of No. 151 Squadron.

August 2017: English Electric Canberra B(I).8 – Part 2 – 61 photos

 

Each photograph is offered at a 300dpi res/13x8cm size making them available for a very good quality digital print, but also for Iphone/IPad, smartphone or computer screen (but should convert the image into a jpeg format for doing so)

Part 2 is presenting aircraft from batch XH, XK, XM.

Most of those images can be found in the book: Allied Wings 19

pdf, Epub and Kindle versions are available in this site: 978-2918590-85-9

 

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 101: Canberra XH208 with the early No. 3 Squadron markings with the black undersurfaces.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 102: The same Canberra, XH208, with the new undersurfaces.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 103: Canberra XH208 at the end of its career with No. 3 Sqn and now coded A.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 104: Canberra XH209 while serving with No. 16 Sqn on its early days with the black undersurfaces.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 105: Canberra XH209 taken on landing in the mid-1960s.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 106: Canberra XH209 with the camouflage and markings of the mid-1960s.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 107: Canberra XH209 around 1970, ‘The Saint’ from the famous TV series appeared on many aircraft along with the shark’s mouth on 16 Sqn’s Canberras.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 108: Canberra XH228 in early No. 3 Sqn’s markings.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 109: Canberra XH228 seen later on with No. 3 Sqn’s markings of the beginning of the 1970’s, and now coded ‘B’.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 110: Canberra XH231 of No. 59 Sqn…

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 111:..and the same aircraft seen in the middle of the 1960s while serving with No. 3 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 112: Canberra XK951 of No. 16 Sqn with the shark’s mouth introduced at the end of sixties.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 113: Canberra XK952 of No. 3 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 114: Canberra XK952 of No. 16 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 115:

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 116: Canberra XK952 of No. 3 Sqn at the end of the sixties.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 117: Canberra XK952 of No. 3 Sqn at the end of the sixties.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 118: Canberra XK952 of No. 3 Sqn at the end of the sixties.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 119: Canberra XM244 seen at the end of its carreer, while serving with No. 16 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 120: Canberra XM244 of No. 3 Sqn and coded ‘C’.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 121: Canberra XM244 of No. 3 Sqn and coded ‘C’.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 122: Canberra XM244 of No. 3 Sqn and coded ‘C’ with the serial reduced in size.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 123: Canberra XM245 in flight while at A&AEE at the end of the fifties.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 124: The same Canberra XM245 taken on the ground during a display.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 125: Canberra XM245 at the end of its career with No. 16 Sqn in 1971, with ‘The Saint’ painted on the fin. Note the small serial on the fuselage and the worn paint of the serial on the wheel door

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 126: Canberra XM245 in 3 Sqn markings and coded ‘D’ in 1970

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 127: Canberra XM262 of No. 16 Sqn with the small squadron crest painted under the nose.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 128: Canberra XM262 of No. 16 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 129: Canberra XM262 of No. 16 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 130: Canberra XM263 of No. 16 sqn with ‘The Saint’ painted on the fin.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 131: two views (with photo 132) of Canberra XM263 in 16 Sqn markings, the unit with which XM263 spent most of its career. Above, around 1966 and, below, in 1970 with the small serial painted on the fuselage and the ‘The Saint’ insignia on the tail.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 132: See photo 131.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 133: Canberra XM264 of No. 14 Sqn, coded ‘B’ on the ground.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 134: Canberra XM264 of No. 14 Sqn, coded ‘B’ in flight.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 135: Canberra XM265 of 16 Sqn in the middle of the sixties

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 136: Canberra XM268 seen while in service with 16 Sqn. Below, in the beginning of the sixties with the black undersurfaces and, above, with the markings adopted in the middle of the sixties when the silver replaced the black paint.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 137: Canberra XM268. See photo 136.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 138: The early days and the final days. Canberra XM269 with 16 Sqn in 1965 above and, below, in 1971 with the shark’s mouth and ‘The Saint’ insignia.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 139: Canberra XM269. See photo 138.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 140: Photos of Canberras of 88 Sqn are not that common and less so with the squadron’s snake on the fin as seen on XM270.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 141: Late markings worn by Canberra XM271 while with 3 Sqn in 1969.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 142: For less than a year, between 1971 and 1972, Canberra XM271 served with 16 Sqn. At that time, the unit was easily identifiable with the shark’s mouth and ‘The Saint’ on the fin.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 143: Wearing 14 Sqn markings, this photo can be easily dated between December 1962 and September 1963 before Canberra XM272 was passed on to 16 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 144: Canberra XM273 win 3 Sqn markings at the end of the sixties. XM273 received the individual letter ‘H’.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 145: Canberra XM274 of 16 Sqn with the standard fuselage band and the squadron crest under the cockpit.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 146: Canberra XM274 after it had been withdrawn from use. While the insignia ‘The Saint’ is painted on the fin, the shark’s mouth is absent.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 147: Nice photo of Canberra XM275 in flight while serving with 3 Sqn. The serial is still black but the individual letters have made their appearance.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 148: Another view of Canberra XM275 in flight.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 149: Another view of Canberra XM275 banking to the left.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 150: Canberra XM276 of 3 Sqn with the first markings and black undersurfaces.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 151: Canberra XM276 still with No. 3 Sqn, but with the black undersurfaces re-painted. Note the large size white serial painted on the fuselage.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 152: Canberra XM276 of 3 Sqn with now the serial painted in black.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 153: Another view of Canberra XM276 of No. 3 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 154: Canberra XM277 taken after its return to 14 Sqn in 1967. Note the letter ‘P’ painted on the fin just below the squadron insignia.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 155: Canberra XM277, while with 3 Sqn this time, coded ‘H’. This letter was taken over by XM273 on 28 October 1971.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 156: Canberra XM278 of No. 14 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 157: Canberra XM278 of No. 14 Sqn, coded ‘O’.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 158: Another view of XM278/O of No. 14 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 159: Canberra XM279 seen at the end of its career with 3 Sqn, coded ‘L’. Note the small serial.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 160: Right side view of Canberra XM936/P of No. 3 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 161: Left side view of Canberra XM936/P of No. 3 Sqn.

June 2017: English Electric Canberra B(I).8 – Part 1 – 50 photos

Each photograph is offered at a 300dpi res/13x8cm size making them available for a very good quality digital print, but also for Iphone/IPad, smartphone or computer screen (but should convert the image into a jpeg format for doing so)

Part 1 is presenting aircraft from batch WT and the prototype.

Most of those images can be found in the book: Allied Wings 19

pdf, Epub and Kindle versions are available in this site: 978-2918590-85-9

 

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 01: The prototype of the B(I)8, VX185, seen on the ground showing the new nose and new shape given to the Canberra.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 02: Canberra VX185 showing off its new lines while banking to the right.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 03: Canberra VX185 taken during one of the test flights.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 04: Canberra WT328 taken while landing showing its black undersurfaces and white serials. This was the first camouflage painted on the Canberra B(I)8 when they were delivered to the RAF. WT328 was never issued to an RAF squadron.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 05: Canberra B(I).8 WT329 was never issued to any squadron and flew various trials with the RAF before being modified as a B(I) Mk.12 for the RNZAF.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 06:  Canberra B(I).8 WT332 of No. 3 Sqn with the letter M painted on the tail in 1971.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 07: Another view of WT332.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 08: Canberra B(I).8 WT332 seen while serving with 3 Sqn (easily identifiable by the green band on the tail and the squadron’s emblem located forward of that). The silver undersides were introduced during the mid-sixties and the serials painted in black.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 09: Canberra B(I).8 WT336 seen in a hangar.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 10: Canberra B(I).8 WT336 served in the early 1970s with 3 Sqn and received the full squadron markings. Note the individual letter painted on the nose wheel door and that the serial is now painted in small letters on the fuselage. (see also photo 11 below)

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 11: see above.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 12: Canberra B(I).8 WT336 of 14 Sqn in 1969-70. Note the squadron’s emblems on the tail and nose.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 13: Canberra B(I).8 WT336 een in flight early in its career with the black undersurfaces.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 14: Two Canberra B(I)8s of 14 Sqn flying low during the early stages of their career as shown the black undersides. They are WT336 and WT345.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 15: Two side views of Canberra B(I). 8 WT337 (see below photo 16) while in service with 14 Sqn. Note that the photographs seem to be similar but note that the squadron’s emblems are not painted on the nose in the upper photograph, which was taken in 1968, while the one below was taken in 1970.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 16: see above.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 17: Canberra B(I).8 WT337 is seen landing and showing its silver undersides and serials.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 18: Canberra B(I).8 WT339, taken before being passed to 3 Sqn, with no markings visible but with the serial painted in small letters on the fuselage

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 19: Canberra B(I).8 WT339 seen in full 14 Sqn markings in 1969 and the individual letter ‘D’

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 20: Another side view of WT339/D of No. 14 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 21: With the snake on the fin, this Canberra B(I).8, WT339, belongs to 88 Sqn.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 22: two photos (with photo 23) of WT340 while in service with 16 Sqn. Above, wearing the markings in force in the mid-sixties when the undersides became silver. Note the fuselage band typical of the squadron’s Canberras with the unit’s emblem on the nose. Below, the same aircraft taken in 1970 with some changes regarding the markings. The serial is painted on the nose wheel door and the squadron crest has replaced the previous emblem.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 23: see above

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 24: Canberra B(I).8 WT341 seen in 1969 in 16 Sqn markings in use at that time: black outlined yellow band on the fuselage and the squadron crest under the cockpit.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 25: Canberra B(I).8 WT342 taken in the final for landing.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 26: Canberra B(I).8 WT342 of 16 Sqn in 1968. Note that the crest was present on both sides of the fuselage under the cockpit

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 27: Canberra B(I).8 WT345, in the early stages of its career, flying with 59 Sqn which was using a black exclamation mark in an red outlined white triangle (just like the road sign!).

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 28: Later on, Canberra B(I).8 WT345 served with 16 Sqn and is seen here in 1967.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 29: By the end of the career of the Canberra B(I).8, the size of the serial painted on the fuselage was reduced as can be seen on WT346 of 3 Sqn in 1971.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 30: Canberra B(I).8 WT346/F of No. 14 Sqn seen while parked.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 31: Canberra B(I). 8 WT347 seen in 1968 with the full 14 Sqn markings. It was allocated the letter ‘N’ within the squadron.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 32:  Canberra B(I). 8 WT347 landing with the flaps down and displaying its undersurfaces.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 33: Canberra B(I).8 WT362 spent most of its career with 14 Sqn. It is seen here in the beginning of the 1960s still with the undersides painted in semi-matt black. Note the squadron’s emblem on the fin.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 34: Two photos of Canberra B(I).8 WT362 in full 14 Sqn markings at the end of the sixties. The two images are similar but note that on the upper photo, the engine intake is painted (probably in red). See also phot 35 below.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 35: see above.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 36: Eventually, Canberra B(I). 8 WT362 ended its career with 3 Sqn and was coded ‘R’. This photo was taken in 1970.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 37: Canberra B(I).8 WT362 of No. 14 Sqn in the forefront seen at dispersal.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 38: Canberra B(I).8 WT363 was first issued to 59 Sqn and carried the ‘danger ahead’ road sign marking.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 39: Canberra B(I).8 WT363 while serving with 14 Sqn at the end of its career, seen here in 1968, coded ‘H’.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 40: If Canberra B(I).8 WT364 served with 3 Sqn for most of the sixties, it received the individual letter ‘N’ in the last years of the decade. This photo was taken in 1969.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 41: Canberra B(I).8 WT365 spent most of its career with 14 Sqn and it is shown here in full squadron markings. By the end of its career with 14, it was allocated the
individual letter ‘J’. See also below.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 42: See above.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 43: Canberra B(I).8 WT365 seen on take off displaying its undersurfaces and serial.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 44: Various views (photos 44  to 49) of Canberra (B).8 WT366 during its time service with 14 Sqn by the end of which it was coded ‘K’. It wears the full squadron markings on the tail and nose.

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 45: See above

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 46: See photo 44

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 47: See photo 44

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 48: See photo 44

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 49: See photo 44

Photo Canberra B (I).8 – 50: Canberra B(I).8 WT368 served only a few weeks with 3 Sqn so it was very lucky to get a photo of it in the unit’s markings.

May 2017: Curtiss biplane fighters (P-1 to P-23) – 24 photos

Photo 01: Curtiss P-1 of the 27th PS/1st PG

Photo 02: Curtiss P-1 of the 17th PS/1st PG

Photo 03: Curtiss P-1B of the 27th PS/1st PG

Photo 04: Curtiss P-1B of the 27th PS/1st PG

Photo 05: Curtiss P-1F s/n 28-42 of 43rd Squadron of Kelly Field.

Photo 11: Curtiss P-2 s/n 25-420, the first of the five built.

Photo 21: Curtiss P-3, one of the five built (26-300, 26-189/293)

Photo 31: Curtiss P-5 s/n 27-327, the first of the five built.

Photo 41: The Curtiss XP-6 (25-423) which was designed frome a Curtiss P-2 airframe.

Photo 42: The Curtiss XP-6B (29-529) was a P-1C modified.

Photo 43:  Curtiss P-6 26-260, the first production aircraft later converted to a P-6A

Photo 44: A Curtiss P-6D, which had a three-blade propeller.

Photo 45: A Curtiss P-6E of the 17th PS/1st PG in 1934 (code 77). The P-6E was the variant the most buit with 46 copies.

Photo 46: Another Curtiss P-6E of the 17th PS/1st PG (coded 56)

Photo 47: A Curtiss P-6E of 94th PS/1st PG

Photo 48: A Curtiss P-6E serving as liason aircraft at Wright-Petterson field.

Photo 49: Another P-6E of the 17th PS/1st PG (coded 44).

Photo 61: Left side view of the sole Curtiss XP-10 (28-387)

Photo 62: Right side view of the Curtiss XP-10 (28-387)

Photo 71: Curtiss XP-17 was built from a P-1 but didn’t enter production.

Photo 81: Curtiss YP-20 s/n 29-374, the sole of its kind.

Photo 85: Curtiss YP-22 s/n 29-262, the sole of its kind.

Photo 91: Curtiss YP-23 was built from a P-6E.

Photo 92: Side view of the YP-23

April 2017: Hawker Nimrod – 17 photos

Each photograph is offered at a 300dpi res/13x8cm size making them available for a very good quality digital print.

Nimrod 01: The Hawker Nimrod S1577, the first Nimrod used for trials.

Nimrod 02: Hawker Nimrod S1579 of No. 408 Flight about to deck land.

Nimrod 03: Hawker Nimrod S1579 of No. 408 Flight.

Nimrod 04: Hawker Nimrod S1582 of No. 800 Sqn.

Nimrod 05: Hawker Nimrod S1587 and K3661 (leading) of No. 802 Sqn.

Nimrod 06: Hawker Nimrod S1618 of the Base Training Squadron of Leuchars.

Nimrod 07: Hawker Nimrod S1621 of No. 800 Sqn.

Nimrod 08: Hawker Nimrod S1623 of No. 802 Sqn.

Nimrod 09: Hawker Nimrod S1635 of No. 800 Sqn.

Nimrod 10: Hawker Nimrod K2823 while being tested at No. 17 Sqn in 1938.

Nimrod 11: Another view of K2823.

Nimrod 12: Hawker Nimrod K2840 of No. 800 Sqn.

Nimrod 13: Hawker Nimrod K2912 of No. 800 Sqn.

Nimrod 14: Hawker Nimrod K3656 of No. 802 Sqn.

Nimrod 15: Hawker Nimrod K4620 of No. 801 Sqn in flight.

Nimrod 16: Another view of Hawker Nimrod K4620 of No. 801 Sqn.

Nimrod 17:  Hawker Nimrod K5057 of No. 800 Sqn.

March 2017: Gloster Javelin FAW.4, FAW.5 & FAW.6 – 38 photos

Each photograph is offered at a 300dpi res/13x8cm size making them available for a very good quality digital print.

Photo 01: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA632/A of No. 11 Sqn.

Photo 02: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA634 used by Gloster for trials and was never issued to any RAF units.

Photo 03: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA635/L of No. 3 Sqn.

Photo 04: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA638/J of No. 3 Sqn.

Photo 05: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA724/F of No. 11 Sqn.

Photo 06: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA728/J of No. 23 Sqn.

Photo 07: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA730/N of No. 72 Sqn.

Photo 08: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA731/M of No. 72 Sqn.

Photo 09: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA752/F of No. 72 Sqn.

Photo 10: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA754/D of No. 72 Sqn.

Photo 11: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA756/T of No. 41 Sqn.

Photo 12: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA758/S of No. 41 Sqn.

Photo 13: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA761/J of No. 41 Sqn.

Photo 14: Gloster Javelin FAW.4 XA767/K of No. 41 Sqn.

Photo 31: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA647/B of No. 151 Sqn.

Photo 32: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA651/D of No. 151 Sqn.

Photo 33: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA652/A of No. 151 Sqn.

Photo 34: Another view of Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA652/A of No. 151 Sqn.

Photo 35: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA652/T of the AWFCS.

Photo 36: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA654/J of No. 72 Sqn.

Photo 37: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA655/F of No. 151 Sqn.

Photo 38: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA658 before its delivery to the RAF (no markings)

Photo 39: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA666/Z of No. 41 Sqn.

Photo 40: Derelick of Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XH690/A of No. 5 Sqn.

Photo 41: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA6693/T of No. 228 OCU.

Photo 42: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA694/R of No. 228 OCU.

Photo 43: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA699/F of No. 151 Sqn.

Photo 44: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA702/V and XA691/E of No. 228 OCU.

Photo 45: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA703/Y of No. 41 Sqn.

Photo 46: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA704/J of No. 5 Sqn.

Photo 47: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA707/B of No. 5 Sqn.

Photo 48: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA713/W of No. 151 Sqn.

Photo 49: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XA715/T of No. 151 Sqn.

Photo 50: Gloster Javelin FAW.5 XH688/X of No. 151 Sqn.

Photo 71: Gloster Javelin FAW.6 XA815/E of No. 85 Sqn.

Photo 72: Gloster Javelin FAW.6 XA819/V of No. 29 Sqn.

Photo 73: Gloster Javelin FAW.6 XA824/H of No. 29 Sqn.

Photo 74: Gloster Javelin FAW.6 XH702/X of AFDS